The Library

The Young Investor

Good stewardship, like all other skills, is best learned at a young age. But when the country’s economic system is so complex that many adults can’t understand it, how can children learn to invest their money wisely?

The Young InvestorGood stewardship, like all other skills, is best learned at a young age.  But when the country’s economic system is so complex that many adults can’t understand it, how can children learn to invest their money wisely?

The Young Investor: Projects and Activities for Making Your Money Grow by Katherine R. Bateman lays out all of the basics with fun and easy-to-understand explanations.  Yes, all the basics — savings accounts, bonds, mutual funds, you name it.

There is a fair amount of history included as well.  Where did the word “salary” come from?  Why is it called “Wall Street”?  The answers are in the book, along with an overview of the economy in general.

For illustration and encouragement, the author provides the real-life example of Billy Ray Fawns, a young entrepreneur who sold fruit at age 6, started his own lawn mowing business at age 19, and earned enough money to buy a seven-acre farm at age 21.

Economics and investing don’t have to be intimidating or boring.  The Young Investor is filled with activities ranging from field trips to research projects.  This fun, hands-on approach combined with the simple, yet informative text makes this a book both children and parents will enjoy.